IEH Academy

General Thermal Bacteriology Applied to Foods

Course details

599.00

2 hrs.

Dr. Gene Bartholomew

This course discusses thermobacteriology as it is applied to food processing. With a focus on the methods of process evaluation, special attention will be given to fundamental concepts on which development of the methods is based. The course indicates some of the many problems that still exist with regard to further refinement in the art of thermal processing of foods.

Benefits and Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this course, we expect trainees to:

  • Appreciate the diversity of microorganisms encountered in foods
  • Grasp the importance of food spoilage and pathogenic
    microorganisms
  • Understand microbial growth and controlling factors
  • Be familiar with logarithmic enumeration of microorganisms
  • Understand bacterial response to lethal temperatures
  • Be comfortable with terms used in thermal bacteriology
  • Use models and temperature profiles of foods during heating to estimate detrimental effects on microorganisms
  • Know how to apply model in different foods and how to locate resources available to practitioners

Agenda

  1. Modes of Heat Transfer and Mass Transfer
  2. Microbiological Considerations: Characteristics of microorganisms that are important to understand for successful thermal Processing
  3. Microbial Diversity: Bacteria and Fungi
  4. Microbial Diversity In Foods: Growth Requirements
  5. Microbial Diversity In Foods: Physical Characteristics and Heat Resistance
  6. Counting Microorganisms: Use of Scientific Notation and Logarithms
  7. Thermal Death at Different Temperatures

Who Should Take this Course?

  • Individuals starting a career in Bacteriology
  • Individuals in the field of in Microbiology and the Microbial Sciences
  • Lead Operators
  • Purchasing
  • Product R&D
  • Maintenance Supervisors
  • Shipping and Receiving Management
  • Sanitation Lead individuals.

Schedule

Course enrollment is closed for the current quarter. 

Contact us to learn more about upcoming training.

Registration and Payment

To Register for this Course, please visit our training portal.

Course Instructor

Dr. Gene Bartholomew

Vice President, Technical Services – IEH Laboratories & Consulting Group

 

Dr. Gene Bartholomew joined IEH as Vice President of Technical Services in 2019. He earned an M.S. and Ph.D. in microbiology from Cornell University and a B.S. in biology from Bucknell University. Dr. Bartholomew began his professional career at International Paper in 1983 as a research scientist. During his 15 years there, he commercialized and validated an aseptic packaging system, managed a beverage pilot plant and its laboratory, started taste panel testing for the company, and advanced to manage several product development groups. Dr. Bartholomew then joined Smithfield Foods Packaged Meats. He started in the John Morrell Group as the corporate director of food safety for 7 meat processing and slaughter facilities and 1 spice plant. He later took on the role of Senior Director of Corporate Food Safety, during which he was responsible for 14 meat processing plants and several FDA-regulated plants. Throughout his 20-year career at Smithfield, he led HACCP plan design and validation, thermal processing, regulatory compliance, sanitation, allergen control and environmental pathogen monitoring. He also managed a corporate microbiology laboratory and its accreditation, and has certifications in HACCP training, BRC and SQF schemes, and is a Preventive Controls Qualified Individual. Dr. Bartholomew was a founding member of the North American Meat Institute Listeria Control Workshop and has taught numerous courses to members of the food industry.

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